Vår islamkramande vänstermedia vilseförde avsiktligt folket och hamrade fram sin egen anti-Trump agenda – igen

Source: Israel Hayom | Media misled the public

Amos Regev

Our sample was small. We worked the old-fashioned way — taking to the streets, talking to people and getting a feel of the situation on the ground. Talking to the doorman and grocer, the barman and the diner waitress, the truck driver and the waste collector — ordinary, hardworking Americans. Who will you vote for, we asked. Nearly all of them — whites, blacks and Hispanics — said the same thing: Donald Trump.

This was the case when the American media featured daily polls categorically declaring that Trump would lose the 2016 presidential elections, alongside reports about the skeletons in his closet, criticism and admonishments, jokes, scorn and slander.

The difference between media punditry and the voice of the simple people was a clear indication that something big was going on, that beneath the surface, right under the pollsters’, experts’ and pundits’ noses, a tremendous shift was taking place. This shift emerged with full force on the one day that counts — Election Day.

The pollsters, experts and pundits — in the United States and Israel — were all wrong. Now let them eat their words.

They were wrong, and they purposely misled the public. And this was no accident; no good-faith action gone wrong.

With all due modesty, we can say Israel Hayom was right. Because we spoke to people, looking them in the eye. And because we recognized the story where others did not.

For over a year, we have been witnessing the biggest story in the world. The story of how America is struggling for its identity, values and global role. The story of fateful choices, the result of which will see someone take the White House and what this individual does or does not do while in the Oval Office, will impact the entire world.

Until Tuesday, everyone was sure this person would be Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. Eager to convince themselves, the pundits did not let the simple facts confuse them. This is why they are likely to be wrong again, the first chance they get.

Sixteen candidates vied for the Republican nomination — veteran, respected politicians along newcomers. Donald Trump was not considered a likely candidate, but rather an anecdotal one.

We saw something different. Boaz Bismuth, Israel Hayom’s foreign news editor, has been covering the news for 30 years. His journalistic instincts are sharper than those of most of his counterparts.

Bismuth first met Trump when no one thought the businessman was a viable candidate, and he was impressed. Later, we both met him.

Up close and personal, Trump is an impressive man. Charismatic, sharp and articulate. Miles away from the image painted by the media. True, Trump also had a hand in painting that image, but he was able get through to the American public on what it holds dearest: pride, patriotism, family and hard work.

U.S. President Barack Obama tried to change America for eight years. With eyes wide open, Obama was determined to undermine the very values that have been the heart and soul of America since its inception; values that reflect ideas first propounded by the Founding Fathers, then shaped during President Andrew Jackson’s term (1829-1837).

Obama’s term in office ends with a divided, polarized America, which questions its role in the world, and where ordinary people, blue-collar people, question their ability to make an honest living.

Trump brought the promise of change, with a different meaning, seeking to recapture the days of Americana and self-respect. Obama tore America at the seams — Trump promised to mend the rifts, warning that Hillary Clinton’s administration would be a direct continuation of Obama’s eight years in office, and therefore continued deterioration. He promised to return America to its past greatness.

And it worked. The indications were right there, among ordinary Americans. But the American media chose to ignore the signs, to delude itself, to deceive voters, and to try to create a reality of its own making.

It did not work in the U.S. any more than it worked in Israel.

Israel Hayom was perhaps the first to compare Trump and President Jackson. The political and economic establishment fought against Jackson, the man of the people.

During one confrontation with a strong bank, the financiers’ representatives tried to convince Jackson to give to banks more leeway “for the people.” “But sir,” Jackson replied, “the people side with me.”

Some of the people were always with Trump. But the media kept that from the public. In the U.S. and in Israel.

Some 95% percent of American media mobilized against Trump. Not only with commentary, with their routine coverage as well. Anything argued against him caused a media earthquake, while any allegation made against Clinton was downplayed and sidelined.

Sound familiar?

Of course it does.

This is exactly how the media conducted itself vis-a-vis Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in the 2015 election — in truth, since 1996. The U.S. media treated Clinton with kid gloves, and the Israeli media does the same to anyone who ever has — or might — challenge Netanyahu.

Some in the U.S. have already admitted Wednesday that New York is a “bubble.” The same was said of Tel Aviv after the 2015 election. All one had to do was look at the faces of most American news anchors to grasp the magnitude of the blow dealt to the media.

This was the case with the Israeli media as well on Wednesday. The more victorious Trump emerged, the more morose they became. We saw the same long faces in Israel following the 2015 elections. For months, the Israeli media has been following the lead of its American counterpart. They were wrong, and they misled the public — big time.

Truth be told, the inability to predict public — any public — sentiment is a shared problem worldwide. The polls failed to predict the results of Brexit — the referendum held in the U.K. on its withdrawal from the European Union, and they failed to predict the results of the elections in Greece, Colombia and even tiny Iceland.

American media should have known better than to count on the polls. Israeli media should know better as well.

I do not know what the results of the elections bode for the American polling industry. I have already seen several mea culpa articles from pollsters.

The media, however, usually prefer to demand explanations from anyone but themselves. The Israeli media, for its part, refuses to learn from its mistakes, carrying on as if nothing has happened.

Those who failed to predict the Israeli public’s sentiment, had no real hope of predicting what could happen in another election, overseas.

But where they failed, Israel Hayom succeeded. This is why the media should do some serious soul-searching. They owe that to their readers, viewers and listeners, and they owe that to themselves.

Our sample was small. We worked the old-fashioned way — taking to the streets, talking to people and getting a feel of the situation on the ground. Talking to the doorman and grocer, the barman and the diner waitress, the truck driver and the waste collector — ordinary, hardworking Americans. Who will you vote for, we asked. Nearly all of them — whites, blacks and Hispanics — said the same thing: Donald Trump.

This was the case when the American media featured daily polls categorically declaring that Trump would lose the 2016 presidential elections, alongside reports about the skeletons in his closet, criticism and admonishments, jokes, scorn and slander.

The difference between media punditry and the voice of the simple people was a clear indication that something big was going on, that beneath the surface, right under the pollsters’, experts’ and pundits’ noses, a tremendous shift was taking place. This shift emerged with full force on the one day that counts — Election Day.

The pollsters, experts and pundits — in the United States and Israel — were all wrong. Now let them eat their words.

They were wrong, and they purposely misled the public. And this was no accident; no good-faith action gone wrong.

With all due modesty, we can say Israel Hayom was right. Because we spoke to people, looking them in the eye. And because we recognized the story where others did not.

For over a year, we have been witnessing the biggest story in the world. The story of how America is struggling for its identity, values and global role. The story of fateful choices, the result of which will see someone take the White House and what this individual does or does not do while in the Oval Office, will impact the entire world.

Until Tuesday, everyone was sure this person would be Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. Eager to convince themselves, the pundits did not let the simple facts confuse them. This is why they are likely to be wrong again, the first chance they get.

Sixteen candidates vied for the Republican nomination — veteran, respected politicians along newcomers. Donald Trump was not considered a likely candidate, but rather an anecdotal one.

We saw something different. Boaz Bismuth, Israel Hayom’s foreign news editor, has been covering the news for 30 years. His journalistic instincts are sharper than those of most of his counterparts.

Bismuth first met Trump when no one thought the businessman was a viable candidate, and he was impressed. Later, we both met him.

Up close and personal, Trump is an impressive man. Charismatic, sharp and articulate. Miles away from the image painted by the media. True, Trump also had a hand in painting that image, but he was able get through to the American public on what it holds dearest: pride, patriotism, family and hard work.

U.S. President Barack Obama tried to change America for eight years. With eyes wide open, Obama was determined to undermine the very values that have been the heart and soul of America since its inception; values that reflect ideas first propounded by the Founding Fathers, then shaped during President Andrew Jackson’s term (1829-1837).

Obama’s term in office ends with a divided, polarized America, which questions its role in the world, and where ordinary people, blue-collar people, question their ability to make an honest living.

Trump brought the promise of change, with a different meaning, seeking to recapture the days of Americana and self-respect. Obama tore America at the seams — Trump promised to mend the rifts, warning that Hillary Clinton’s administration would be a direct continuation of Obama’s eight years in office, and therefore continued deterioration. He promised to return America to its past greatness.

And it worked. The indications were right there, among ordinary Americans. But the American media chose to ignore the signs, to delude itself, to deceive voters, and to try to create a reality of its own making.

It did not work in the U.S. any more than it worked in Israel.

Israel Hayom was perhaps the first to compare Trump and President Jackson. The political and economic establishment fought against Jackson, the man of the people.

During one confrontation with a strong bank, the financiers’ representatives tried to convince Jackson to give to banks more leeway “for the people.” “But sir,” Jackson replied, “the people side with me.”

Some of the people were always with Trump. But the media kept that from the public. In the U.S. and in Israel.

Some 95% percent of American media mobilized against Trump. Not only with commentary, with their routine coverage as well. Anything argued against him caused a media earthquake, while any allegation made against Clinton was downplayed and sidelined.

Sound familiar?

Of course it does.

This is exactly how the media conducted itself vis-a-vis Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in the 2015 election — in truth, since 1996. The U.S. media treated Clinton with kid gloves, and the Israeli media does the same to anyone who ever has — or might — challenge Netanyahu.

Some in the U.S. have already admitted Wednesday that New York is a “bubble.” The same was said of Tel Aviv after the 2015 election. All one had to do was look at the faces of most American news anchors to grasp the magnitude of the blow dealt to the media.

This was the case with the Israeli media as well on Wednesday. The more victorious Trump emerged, the more morose they became. We saw the same long faces in Israel following the 2015 elections. For months, the Israeli media has been following the lead of its American counterpart. They were wrong, and they misled the public — big time.

Truth be told, the inability to predict public — any public — sentiment is a shared problem worldwide. The polls failed to predict the results of Brexit — the referendum held in the U.K. on its withdrawal from the European Union, and they failed to predict the results of the elections in Greece, Colombia and even tiny Iceland.

American media should have known better than to count on the polls. Israeli media should know better as well.

I do not know what the results of the elections bode for the American polling industry. I have already seen several mea culpa articles from pollsters.

The media, however, usually prefer to demand explanations from anyone but themselves. The Israeli media, for its part, refuses to learn from its mistakes, carrying on as if nothing has happened.

Those who failed to predict the Israeli public’s sentiment, had no real hope of predicting what could happen in another election, overseas.

But where they failed, Israel Hayom succeeded. This is why the media should do some serious soul-searching. They owe that to their readers, viewers and listeners, and they owe that to themselves.

Det här inlägget postades i Hot mot DEMOKRATI, Islamister / Jihadister, Israel, USA. Bokmärk permalänken.

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